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Unscripted outcomes

Jewish Calendar, Hebrew Date Converter, Holidays - hebcal.com

staff:

Have a great weekend, Tumblr. 

Jackie chan

(Source: 7ae)

weaponslover:

Reloading a PS90.

weaponslover:

Reloading a PS90.

emergentfutures:

The Chairless Chair, an invisible chair that you can wear
- It’s like a chair that isn’t there, but magically appears whenever you need it. It’s called the Chairless Chair and you wear it on your legs like an exoskeleton: when it’s not activated, you can walk normally or even run. And then, at the touch of a button, it locks into place and you can sit down on it. Like a chair that is now there.
"The idea came from wanting to sit anywhere and everywhere, and from working in a UK packaging factory when I was 17," says Keith Gunura, the 29-year old CEO and co-founder of noonee, the Zurich-based startup behind the device, “standing for hours on end causes a lot of distress to lower limbs, but most workers get very few breaks and chairs are rarely provided, because they take up too much space. So I thought that the best idea was to strap an unobtrusive chair directly to myself.”
Full Story: CNN

emergentfutures:

The Chairless Chair, an invisible chair that you can wear

- It’s like a chair that isn’t there, but magically appears whenever you need it. It’s called the Chairless Chair and you wear it on your legs like an exoskeleton: when it’s not activated, you can walk normally or even run. And then, at the touch of a button, it locks into place and you can sit down on it. Like a chair that is now there.

"The idea came from wanting to sit anywhere and everywhere, and from working in a UK packaging factory when I was 17," says Keith Gunura, the 29-year old CEO and co-founder of noonee, the Zurich-based startup behind the device, “standing for hours on end causes a lot of distress to lower limbs, but most workers get very few breaks and chairs are rarely provided, because they take up too much space. So I thought that the best idea was to strap an unobtrusive chair directly to myself.”

Full Story: CNN

(via fleshcoatedtechnology)

libutron:

"Follow Me" | ©Cheryl Crowley
hippie—shit:

We Heart It.
hayakawajunpei:

The secret techniques of Araki Tõ Ryū (founded around 1720).
These hiden gokui (secret scrolls) of Araki To Ryū (written in 1789) detail the okugi or the secret techniques of kyūsho zeme (kyūsho attack). 
Kyūsho (also called tsubo) are anatomically weak points on the human body that when struck or pressed produce pain, cause a person to loose consciousness, or even maim and kill. 
The art for striking these kyūsho is called kenpõ (fist way) in the Araki Tõ Ryū and the methods of actually striking is termed atemijutsu (body striking methods). 
Araki Tõ Ryū Kenpõ relies on the use of striking with gekitotsubuki (small hidden weapons), the empty hands, the elbows, and the knees. The feet are rarely used to strike, but some techniques for heel strikes are detailed.
The scroll lists the kyūsho and the techniques used but doesn’t detail what the techniques actually involved. Martial scrolls like this, called densho (transmission scroll), were intended only for those who had mastered the school and reached the level of proficiency enabling them to use the secret transmissions. Terms used are only recognisable to an actual practitioner of the school to avoid a non-practitioner, and possible enemy, from using the scroll to learn the techniques.
Killing methods are termed sappõ (killing methods) and those methods that use the kyūsho for healing are called kappõ (resuscitation methods). These two methods combined are termed sakkapõ (killing and resuscitating methods).
Striking a persons vulnerable points was privileged knowledge closely guarded by martial schools and inventors of schools spent considerable effort investigating the effects of striking them and how to apply effective methods. Atemijutsu can be applied to neutralise a limb, especially a weapon arm, or even to cause an opponent to loose consciousness.
In the Japanese martial arts, striking is usually only used as a distraction tactic or to weaken the opponent before applying a throw or trip to bring him down, however, some kyūsho when struck will have a numbing affect and later may even cause paralysis or even death.
© James Kemlo 

hayakawajunpei:

The secret techniques of Araki Tõ Ryū (founded around 1720).

These hiden gokui (secret scrolls) of Araki To Ryū (written in 1789) detail the okugi or the secret techniques of kyūsho zeme (kyūsho attack)

Kyūsho (also called tsubo) are anatomically weak points on the human body that when struck or pressed produce pain, cause a person to loose consciousness, or even maim and kill. 

The art for striking these kyūsho is called kenpõ (fist way) in the Araki Tõ Ryū and the methods of actually striking is termed atemijutsu (body striking methods). 

Araki Tõ Ryū Kenpõ relies on the use of striking with gekitotsubuki (small hidden weapons), the empty hands, the elbows, and the knees. The feet are rarely used to strike, but some techniques for heel strikes are detailed.

The scroll lists the kyūsho and the techniques used but doesn’t detail what the techniques actually involved. Martial scrolls like this, called densho (transmission scroll), were intended only for those who had mastered the school and reached the level of proficiency enabling them to use the secret transmissions. Terms used are only recognisable to an actual practitioner of the school to avoid a non-practitioner, and possible enemy, from using the scroll to learn the techniques.

Killing methods are termed sappõ (killing methods) and those methods that use the kyūsho for healing are called kappõ (resuscitation methods). These two methods combined are termed sakkapõ (killing and resuscitating methods).

Striking a persons vulnerable points was privileged knowledge closely guarded by martial schools and inventors of schools spent considerable effort investigating the effects of striking them and how to apply effective methods. Atemijutsu can be applied to neutralise a limb, especially a weapon arm, or even to cause an opponent to loose consciousness.

In the Japanese martial arts, striking is usually only used as a distraction tactic or to weaken the opponent before applying a throw or trip to bring him down, however, some kyūsho when struck will have a numbing affect and later may even cause paralysis or even death.

© James Kemlo 

charlietimms:

Zheng Chunhui, a famous Chinese wood carver spent 4 years engineering this master piece from a single tree. Based on a famous Chinese painting “Along the River During the Quingming Festival” the carving echoes the daily life of the 12th century Chinese local. The level of detail is stunning!

(via sino-archives)

wildcat2030:

This is what your home on Mars could look like -NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet. - Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)

wildcat2030:

This is what your home on Mars could look like
-
NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet.
-
Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)